Category Archives: images

So We Finally Decorated Our Walls

Took these photos a week or so ago, after putting these up. I’m no expert picture hanger, and the frames are just cheap and cheerfuls from The Range, but I think the art in them more than makes up for my lame skillz.

I’ll acknowledge here and now that a) I’m just showing off, because I think some of this stuff is pretty cool, and b) these aren’t great photos: the light isn’t great in the corridors in our house, and I’m just using the camera on my phone, so.

These are as good a place as any to start. Pretty minimal, but cute, tiny triptych we got from one of those trendy replica 70s camera shops in Brighton, but it’s taken bloody ages to actually put them anywhere. They’re on the wall facing the top of the stairs, just outside the toilet. I guess I could claim there’s a water theme going on.

Water Feature

(But there isn’t.)

 

This is our upstairs corridor, and I’m hoping to fill it up at some point. This isn’t a particularly clear photo – there’s no natural light up there – but I wanted to show you roughly how these pictures fit together.

Context

I’ve had this Mucha print for years, hanging about in one of my big portfolio folders that’s knocking around from when I did art A-levels. Last week it came down to either putting it up somewhere or acknowledging that I never would and getting rid of it.

Mucha

It doesn’t really square with the other stuff that’s up – it’s got that weird “embossed/mounted” thing going on – but I’m glad I didn’t get rid of it. It’s a beautiful image.

 

This is one of a handful of these images that found a home on the wall within six months of me buying it. I picked it up from Mr Erskine at ThoughtBubble 2013 – which I think is the first time I met him in person, which was lovely! – and it’s representative of a particular time in comics, and in his work, that really resonates with me.

Erskine

 

We’re lucky enough to have spent a bit of time with the artists on these two pieces.

The Ororo/Storm image is by Dave Stokes, and if you can find him at a convention or online, you should definitely pick up one of his art books, at the very least.

This original art was very reasonably priced indeed!

Stokes_Cadwell

…As was this glorious piece of expressionistic loveliness from Warwick Johnson-Cadwell. Hawk The Slayer, or the Beastmaster? To be honest, I can’t remember without checking… I don’t know either film, but I loved the composition, the very direct colour, and the way Warwick draws scenery!

This is a cool print by David Wynne:

David Wynne

It was part of a set of three, but I couldn’t afford/place all of them, so I picked my favourite. I love the colour, the monsters, and the old-time Hollywood greats in the background.

(If I’m honest, the bit I really focus on are that awesome Laurel and Hardy in the background.)

An oddity, here… I know that Sandman image was promotional, for the Dream Hunters graphic novel, but I’ve no idea where I got it from. I’ve definitely never met Neil Gaiman, or Yoshitaka Amano.

Amato_Langridge

It’s lovely, though!

And this is a page from one of the Fred The Clown comics. I’ve got two original pieces of Roger Langridge art, and I think his was the first original art I ever did buy.

He’s amazing.

This is a Kabuki print thing I got for a birthday, over ten years ago.

Kabuki

It isn’t a particularly unusual image, and to be honest it’s little more than poster (although I think it might be signed, and part of a small cluster of similar items that I got given at the same time). But it’s been knocking around, just resting on top of a shelf unit, for long enough that Amy and I have got quite fond of it.

Here’s one of the oldest, most gorgeous art things I own, nestled in a spot that looks like an after-thought, but is actually right there in the middle of our staircase. It’s a set of lithographs from 1980 called World Without End, painted by Jeffrey Catherine Jones

Jeff Jonest

In another, more beautiful world, Jones is still making comics and art and everybody knows her work.

Not this one.

Downstairs is even more erratic than up. Here’s one wall:

Dining room wall

The far left is one of those cheap-but-pretty canvas acrylics bought from a little shop in a little alley built into a steep hill on a Greek honeymoon.

In the middle there’s a painting by an old friend of mine called Maja Hill. We bumped into her and her husband for the first time in ages the other week.

On the right is one of three commissions we’ve had from indie publishing hero Marc Ellerby. I think this one was a present for my wife, but I can’t remember what the occasion was. The main thinking behind it was that our previous group drawing from him was from before we had the stupid little black dog Willow.

Then there’s these two behemoths:

Blade of the Immortal context

I’m still a little bit stunned that Amy let me put these up, as she has no relationship with the comic they’re from, but I guess the gorgeousness of the painted art won her over. These are both Blade Of The Immortal prints. The one on the left is one of my favourite pieces of art. Both are, I believe, by Hiroaki Samura.

Finally, just a quick bonus shot of what our graphic novels (some of them, anyway) look like since we moved them downstairs. It might not be clear from this photo, but look at the bottom…

Shelves

…these units are pushed back into an odd corner of our living room, and are fitted to the shape of the curved wall. It looks pretty cute in person.

So anyway, self-indulgent I know, but some of that art is SO DAMN PRETTY. When I get a minute, I’ll link to all of the artists that I got that art from, but you should definitely consider Googling them and throwing some money their way if you have it!

Caption 2008 – Exhaustathon!

Last week was a week of lots of travelling around and not sleeping enough, so by the time it culminated in an early start and a lift to Oxford for this year’s Caption Small Press Convention, I was already knackered.

This probably explains why the only photos I took were this:

Caption 2008 - David Baillie and Dan Lester Prize Bananas

And this:
Caption 2008 - David Baillie's Prize Banana

It’s a peculiar con for me, where I don’t have anything to sell, or even in the works mini-comic wise, but where everybody I know there does. As such, it becomes more of a social event then anything else – the main hall is small, and after one circuit I was pretty much ready to go to the bar.

And sadly the bar was a bit un-bar-like, with beer in cans and bottles, and pop in big Tesco’s bottles, so flat and warm before it had made it into your glass.

All that said, I had a lot of fun, and thanks to the organisapeeps (of whom I only actually know Jay and Selina) for doing such good work with the raw materials available to them – after all, one of the main strengths of mini-comics in the first place.

Things of note, and key moments:

There are no attractive women in Eastleigh on a Saturday morning.

Oxford has shitty areas too! And they’re actually a little more depressing than their equivalent here in Southampton!
Continue reading

Elephant Words – A New Dawn, A New Day – Phase Two Writers Kick Ass

Can’t quite believe I’ve failed to do this already.

Just over a week ago, Elephant Words went through it’s biggest changes to date. As well as everything else, this means that it was my first week away from the site.

As it turns out, the new roster did the site proud, and some of the pieces even made it straight to the top of my all time favourite Elephants.

They were based on this image, posted by Andy Cheverton, taken by Princess Bala Vera:

Magnetic Letters
Continue reading

Elephant Words – “The Imaginary”

This week at Elephant Words, Xander Bennett posted a beautiful photo by Austin Andrews:

The Bowhunter

It was my turn to post today, and I did, but only just, ten or so minutes ago.

My piece is called “The Imaginary”:

CAPTION:
THE FOLLOWING PREVIEW HAS BEEN APPROVED FOR
ALL AUDIENCES

[Music: "Hoppipolla" by Sigur Ros]

[Studio Titlecards]

[CUT TO: Tracking shot of leafy suburb, colour saturated to look like the 80s.]

[The same suburb - we're now closer in on one garden. Two young boys, around ten years old, are running around, chasing each other.]

NARRATOR (V.O.):
When Nathan Ray was a boy, he had the best friend in the world…

[Close on the boys. One is pale skinned, blond and scrawny, stripped to the waist, the other darker, with Oriental features - his outfit more traditional or rustic, a small knife attached by thong to his waist. One catches the other, and they wrestle.]

[Close up on the boys faces, as they laugh and jostle.]

[CUT TO: The boys, a couple years older, walking through the darkened woods, sunlight shafting through the trees.]

NATHAN (O.S.):
It isn’t fair. How come you don’t get to go to school? I’ll miss you.

PAZU (O.S.):
I’ll still be here.

[Long shot of the woods, the sky darkening.]

PAZU (V.O.):
I’ll always be here.

I should say now, on the record, that I think what I’ve achieved this time is a fine validation of the hard and excellent work that the decent movie or TV trailer makers do, because basically, I make it look as hard as anything.

There’s a thread of deliberate parody in the piece, along with what I think is a really nice story, but I think they may get overwhelmed with the clunkiness and uncertainty of my dabbling with the format, which I tend to believe never gets scripted out normally anyway – falling instead to the skills of really quite talented editors instead.

Douglas and Xander do this stuff much better than I do, is what I’m saying.

But all that aside, it may divert you for a few minutes! I’d like to know what you think. You can read the whole piece here: http://elephantwords.co.uk/2008/07/15/the-imaginary/

Please comment either here, there, or in the forum thread attached to the piece.